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Full text of "Maids and a Man 1928"



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TUBNAH 



Maids and a Man 
1928 






Published by the 
Senior and Junior Classes of the 

Tiibman Higli School 

Augusta, Georgia 




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PRIHCIPAL 



DEDICATION 

TO THE 

CLUB OF AUGUSTA 



5se ideals of service have been an inspiration 
which we shall endeavor to emulate, and whose presi- 
dent is our beloved principal, we dedicate this volume 
of Maids and a Man. 




MINERVA 



Rotary International now girdles the world. 
France with her fashions, Spain with her 
toreadors, Holland with her windmills, Japan 
with her Jinrikishas are among the countries 
we have taken for decorative motifs in this 
edition of Maids and a Man« That all na- 
tions may live in peace and good will with 
America, our own homeland, is the humble 
hope of the students of Tubman High School. 




JL 



EM&IJiriD 




CONTENTS 



THE SCHOOL 
SENIORS 

JUNIORS 

SOPHOMORES AND FRESHMEN 

ACTIVITIES 

FEATURES 




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The Scliool 



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Faculty 



T. H. Garrett 

Princi/'al 

Miss A. Dorijthy Haixs 
Latin 

Miss Ada G. Woods 
English 

Miss Annie M. Page 
French 

Miss Gertrude G. Comey 
En<;lisli 

Miss Marcia A. Clark 
Domestic Art 

Miss Williamette Green 

Mathematics 

Mrs. M. R. Ridciely 
Latin 

Miss Lois Eve 

Science 

Miss Dorothy Halbert 

Music 

Miss Ama Lee Null 
Spanish 

Miss Eleanor Boatwright 
History 

Miss Ann Braddy 

Mathematics 

IMiss ]\Iarion Hamilton 
History 

Mrs. W. W. Snow 
French 

Mrs. W. C. Lyeth 

English 

Miss Edith Nachman 
Geography 

Miss Lora AL Pearce 
English 

Miss 



Miss Mary E. Bryant 

Mathematics 

Miss Bessie Mary Dudley 
English 

Miss Stella Stephens 
Mathematics 

Miss Laura Panebaker 
Science 

Miss Susie Langford 
iMathematics 

Miss Gladys Carson 
History 

Miss Celeste Wickliffe 
Physical E/lucation 

Miss Eloise Norris 
Science 

Miss Mary Gilliland 

IMathematics 

Miss Elizabeth Henry 
English 

Miss Belle Walker 
History and Civics 

Miss Agnes Latham 
Commercial 

Miss Sibyl Joy Ingram 
Commercial 

Miss Lattry Donnelly 
Commercial 

Miss Amy Jones 
Domestic Science 

AIiss Ann D. Wilson 
Physical Education 

Mrs. M. M. Owens 
Librarian 

Miss Ann G. Smith 
Asst. Domestic Science 



Louise Wilson 
Secretary 



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Senior Class 




OFFICERS 

Anxa Montgomery . . Pres'uhnt 
Sarah Bright Gracey, J'ice-Presidcnt 
Elizabeth Lockhart . Sec. o Trcas. 



Motto: "Live to ham and learn to 
live." 



Color: Purple and Jf'hite. 

Flower: If'hite Rosebud. 

Anna Montiiomery 

W'e Instinctively recall the song "Mar- 
velous," when we think of Anna. She is 
a staunch friend, a talented pianist, a 
perfect student — and a marvelous presi- 
dent. We need to brush the cobwebs off 
our stock of superlatives when we re- 
count the virtues of our own Anna. 



BEK 



Thomas Harry Garrett 

This year, nineteen hundred and twenty-eiiiht, beinfi the twenty-fifth anniversary 
of Mr. Garrett's inauguration as principal of the Tubman High School, we take 
this opportunity to express our gratitude for his deep and personal interest in us — 
and our joy in the success he has made of his life-work. Not a girl has entered 
the portals of Tubman who has not fallen under the spell of his personality: his 
wit and his dignity, his sympathy and his trust have made him our loved and honored 
friend. The past quarter of a century is a period of which the Tubman is justly 
proud. 



10 



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Jeaxette Anthony 
■■Ain't Slic SK'cct?" 
Regardless of where or when we meet 
Jeanette, she always has a sweet smile for 
us. 

Sara Anthony 

-.4 Perfect Day." 
All days are perfect for Sara, since she 
finished in February and doesn't have to 
take dictation and typewriting any more. 

GiRZELDA ArNETTE 

'■irimt Do I Care What Somebody Said?" 
Girzelda has such a lovely, carefree air. 
But she may well have, for all the things 
we hear about her are complimentary. 

Mary Babbitt 

"Let Us Smile Under Your Umbrella." 
Mary not only has a cheery smile, but 
she is perfectly willing to share her um- 
brella with us. Her unfailing generosity 
has won all our hearts. 

Rachel Bailey 

"Sti'cet Some One." 
Rachel is more than a someone ; she's 
somebody, as her numerous friends prove, 
and she's as sweet a girl as is to be found. 

Frances Barton 

■■Al'a'ays." 
Frances always seems carefree and 
happy. This is the question : Does she ever 
have any cares ? 

Marguerite Bothwell 

"My Little Margie." 
Margie, or Peggy, as she is better known, 
has the most adorable little pug nose. 
We've noticed that others besides Tubman 
girls have been attracted by its pertness. 

Evelyn Brantley 
"Some One Like You." 
Evelyn is a living ad\'ertisement of a real 
Tubmanite. She's a good old sport and a 
lovable pal. 

Ruth Brisendine 

"My Buddie." 
Ruth's ability to make and hold friends 
has proved what a good buddie she can be. 

Marian Browne 

"Broum. Eyes. Why Are You Blue?" 
This is so rare that it very naturally 
causes comment. Usually Marian's eyes are 
twinkling and gay, and it is thus that we 
hope they may always be. 




11 



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Willie Buck 

"Docs S[^canniiit Lose Its fluz'or Over- 
Night?" 
We've written to Wrigley's for the an- 
swer, but we feel that Willie can give us 
a more satisfactory one. 

Marian Busbia 

"Sometimes I'm Happy.'' 
So far as we know, the "sometimes'' is 
all the time, for Marian has a very happy 
faculty of not taking things seriously. 

Inez Byrd 

"My Little Bro'^i'ii-HycJ Susan." 
Inez is little and brown-eyed, although 
her name isn't Susan. She is little only 
in stature, because her heart is verj' big. 

Marelle Cartledge 

"Liiulbcrgli Mareli." 
IMabelle has almost as many medals for 
her expert typing as Lindliergh has for his 
aviation feats, and if she keeps up her 
present rate she might some day have as 
many. 

Thelala Chancey 

"Selwol-Hottse Blues.'' 

Thelma may have "school-house" blues, 

but slie's so quiet and nice that every one 

is ignorant of the fact that she suffers from 

these attacks. 

Katie Clark 

"A'-/v'-A'-/v(;/_v." 
When Katie arises to deliver an oration 
in English, we all stop, look, and listen! 

Shirley Cobb 

"Xo Wonder I'm Happy." 
Tlio' Shirley may not be able to play ball 
like her father, in the game of hearts we 
are sure she will always win, judging by 
her many friends in Tubman. 

Mary Clark 

".S'a'cet Stranger." 
Mary just came to us this year. Her 
scholastic ability is attested to by her good 
marks, and her friendly nature l)y her ever- 
growing popularity. 

Edith Connor 

"The Girl friend." 
.\Ithciugli Edith is the girl friend to a 
great many, her dates must be secondary — 
for her studies do not seem the least neg- 
lected. 

Ci.eo Cro.mer 

"You Never Can Tell." 
Cleo reminds us of "Innocents .\broad" 
when il conies to beau.x. but we have al- 
wavs lieard that "Gentlemen Prefer 
Blondes.'' 



12 



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LixDA Davidson 

"LticL'y Lindy." 
It really should be lucky "We," for what 
would our class do without the versatile 
Liuda? If we want a clever burlesque of 
the "Lily Maid of Astolat," or a dashing 
hero for the Junior play, we just naturally 
turn to Linda. 

Louise Davis 

"Knee Prcf' ill Daisies aiuf lleiul Orer 

Heels in Love." 
Enough said. 

Martha Dorn 

"Daien." 
We have chosen to call Martha "Dawn." 
not only in our careless Southern way, but 
because of her natural fairness, which 
makes this metaphor very fitting. 

Mary Dye 

"Remember — .'" 
Oh, yes. We all remember Mary as the 
intrepid explorer of Tubman. She reall}- 
has a historical background, 

Julia Edwards 

"Let Me Call You Siceetheart." 
Julia is quiet and rather dignified when 
it comes to lo\e affairs, but we wonder ? 

Irene Elliott 

"Until Toiiwrroz^'." 
We hear that Irene is just waiting until 
tomorrow when she will be free from the 
bonds of trouble to say "Yes." 

Harriet Fiske 

"Siuishine.' 

Harriet is forever bubbling over with 

sparkling wit. Her clever tongue keeps all 

her classes in an uproar. Never was there 

a more excellent gloom-chaser than "Fatty." 

Mary Claire Gardiner 

"Collegiate." 

Mary Claire not only is "collegiate" in 

looks and dress, but in her choice of the 

opposite sex also. She seems to have a 

weakness for the ones from Georgia. 

Harriet Garrett 

"Hey. Diddle-Diddle." 
"Teet\'" not only can jump over the moon 
on field day. but almost anj- old day she 
displays a rollicking sen.se of fun that prob- 
ably was inherited straight from her father. 

Florence Gilchrist 

"Hoz^' You Gunne to Kcef' 'Em Dozen On 
the Fann?'' 
Florence lives in the hushed stillness of 
the country. There, with nothing to dis- 
turb her, she is able to learn her lessons 
so well as to earn our envy. 




13 



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Margaret Gilson 

"W'hafll ]]'c Do on a Dew, Dcn', Dezfv 
Day?" 
Margaret is liable to do the unexpected. 
Her incorrigible sense of humor will 
doubtless let her burlesque St. Peter, when 
once she has passed safely through the 
Pearly Gates. 

Lees Goldberg 

"U'hcrc'd You Get Those Eycsf" 

You can't meet Lees and forget those eyes. 

They're the most beautiful, haunting, 

taunting black eyes that ever made a heart 

miss a beat. 

]\1abel Goodell 

"Everything Peaclies." 

This is quite true with Mabel when she 

has a pencil and pad with which to sketch. 

Many a good-looking hand-painted uke can 

be traced to this source. 

Margaret Goss 
"IVhafll I Do?" 

E\eryone wonders what Margaret will do 
when she leaves Tubman and with it her 
teacher crushes. Here's to her success in 
tlie future. 

Sarah Bright Gracey 
"Is It Possible?" 

That's what we all ask when we see 
Sarah Bright's report card. What's in a 
name? A great deal in this case, for 
Sadie's second one is the keynote to the 
whole matter. 

Alice Griffin 

"Just Call On Me." 

Alice is just that type. Whenever there's 
anything doing, you know that you can 
count on her. Her agreeable nature is one 
of the reasons that everyone loves her so. 
Margaret Hallman 
"Castles in the Air." 
Margaret has such an unassuming and 
thoughtful nature that we often suspect 
her of building castles in the air. 

Louise Hard.away 

"My Little Girl." 
Louise's answers in class are much too 
liig for such a little girl ; however, this 
combination seems to have great appeal 
with the teachers. 

Amelia Harley 

"Somewhere a I'oiee is Calling." 
\ voice is calling .Amelia to travel, and 
her wildest desire is to heed the call. 
ALary Anna Harman 
"Because." 
Do we need to ask why? No, "because" 
she's a true blue friend and all of us love 
her. 



14 



^VIariax Harrisox 

"Bright Eyes." 
Tlie laughter which is always in Marian ;- 
eyes seems to be contagious. Everyone 
enjoys being in Marian's presence because 
she's so amiable. 

Viola Helmly 
'■ll'liaf Docs It Mailer^" 
\'iola doesn't let things matter to her. 
She takes them as they come and because 
of her calm disposition they pass on. leav- 
ing her unruffled. 

Mabel Haley Hill 

"Over the Hills and Far Az^'ay." 
Vou might search over the hills and far 
away without finding another such as our 
Mabel. She has poise and grace and a 
flair for poetry that make her absolutel\ 
irresistible. 

Wyoma Hobbs 

"U'/ieii the Dreams of a Dreamer Come 
True." 
If Wyoma's dreams are for success alon^*' 
scholastic lines, they are sure to come true, 
because she is an unusually bright pupil. 

Mildred Holley 

"Oft in the Stilly Night—" 
Mildred has sat up, burning the midniglit 
electric bulb, for she is as conscientious a.-, 
she is tiny. 

Norma House 
"/ Just Roll Along Having My Ups and 
Dozens." 
Judging from Norma's smiling face, one 
would decide that the gods had made her 
life all "ups." Norma's good nature ha> 
won for her many friends. 

Katharine Hull 

"Adorable." 
Katharine is adorable in every wa>" : 
words, actions, and looks. She is such an 
altogether charming girl that every one 
adores her. 

W.aurega Jackson 

"Indian Love Call." 
Waurega's Indian name has given the 
study hall teachers no end of trouble. But 
it seems to roll very easil}' and sweetly from 
the tongue of a certain "party." 

Carolyn Jarrett 

"My Blue Heaven." 
Carolyn seems to be supremely happy and 
quite in heaven the night after she enter- 
tains "that heavy date." 

Betty Jones 

"There's Everything Nice About Yoxi." 

We think Betty is going to be an arche- 

ologist. She just dotes on digging up 

facts in chemistry and phrases in French. 

Do we love her? I'll say we do. 




15 



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Dorothy Jones 

"Girl oj .l/_r Dreams." 
Dot's flawless complexion and golden 
liair are enough to make her any one's 
dream girl. Her face is not her only for- 
tnne, however, for besides being a real 
student, she's a born atlilete. 
Mary Joplin 
"Mary, What Arc You Waiting Forf" 
Mary doesn't wait ; she's always "there 
witli the goods." but we've heard that there 
is someone who is always waiting on her 
doorstep. 

BiLLiii Kelly 

"Dainty Miss.'' 
This e.Nactly describes our Billie, who is 
always dainty and demure. There are a 
great many of her admirers w'ho will tell 
you that her charm lies not only in her 
looks. 

Id.alene Kimbrell 
"Breezing Along Il'itli the Breeze." 
Idalene is the breezy type that doesn't 
let anything worry her. She's always ready 
for a good time. 

Elin'or Kitchens 
"U eazing Dreams." 
Her thoughtful, wistful eyes make us 
feel that she is dreaming of — oh, let's not 
interrupt her dreams. 

M.arie Laird 

"Sii-'cet Marie." 

Marie is more than sweet ; she is very 

<lurable. She is the kind of person we like 

to have around, especially in our basket-ball 

games. 

Dolly Lam back 
"Belieze Me, if All Those Endearing Young 
Charms." 
Even if Dolly's charms were to fade, she 
would still be just as beloved, for the gods 
liberally endowed her with personality as 
well as style. 

NoR.A Lamkin 

•7 Told Them All About You." 

You can't help telling other people about 

Nora's brains. She's really quite talented 

along poetic lines, besides just naturally 

having book sense. 

IVLarian Layton 
"Lady. Be Good." 
Marian's twinkling blue eyes give us 
tlic impression that she's always up to mis- 
chief : hence we implore her — Lady, be 
good ! 

Lois Levy 

"Braid the i?(!ivji Hair." 
Lois certainly disproves .\nita Loos's 
theory. Her shimmering mass of dark 
hair reminds one of that proverbial "raven's 
wing." 



Hi 



Rose Levy 
■•.-; XiglU in June." 
Now her highest ambition is a "niglit in 
June" when she will be a sweet girl grad- 
uate, and after that — ? 

Elizabeth Lockhart 
"C'esi Vous." 
Lots of people feel that way about Lib 
and we don't wonder. She's so nimble of 
brain, so nimble of foot, and so gay of 
heart that she comes near to being the 
Tubman ideal. 

Ruby Lombard 
"Thanks for I he Buggy Ride." 
What would Miss Norris do on Mon- 
days without her "buggy ride" with Rub\ ? 
But what would we do every day without 
Ruby, who's as precious to us as her name 
indicates? 

ALary Marsh 

"Sixty Seconds Every Minute." 
Mary is working with her art — and her 
efforts are not in vain, for Mary's posters 
are the pride of Tubman. She even illus- 
trates her drawings with clever themes in 
English. 

Mary Masur 
'■Pal O' Mine." 
JMary has been a good pal and an un- 
selfish friend to us ever since she came to 
Tubman from New York. Her intellect 
radiates in biology class, for she is par- 
ticularly interested in this work. 

K.atherine M.atheny 
"Blue Diamonds." 
We all envy Katherine and her exquisite 
diamonds. Here's hoping her life will be 
as full of success as her hair is of curls. 

Martha Murphey 

"Smiles." 
"But the smiles that fill my life with sun- 
shine are the smiles that you give to me'' — 
that's the way everyone feels about Martha, 
Tubman's usher-ess, par excellence. 

Clemexs McClain 
"Whist'ering Hope." 
Clemens is rather quiet, but it has been 
whispered that her hope is to graduate — 
and then — ? 

Lucille McClain 

"I'll Say She Does." 
Does Lucille ever think of someone in 
a certain town? I'll say she does. 

Evelyn McColloch 
"Here I Aw." 
Yes. sir ! There she is — ^the girl with the 
serious face, whose occasional grin redeems 
her with many of her classmates for over- 
shadowing them in their school work. 




17 



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Leona McKenzie 

"Till My Luck Comes Rolliti' Along." 
Leona says she may not be very lucUy 
now, but just you wait. 

Fanny McNorrill 
"Loz'c's Old Sn'cct Song.'' 
Wouldn't Fanny make a perfect lieroine 
of the "Gay Nineties?" Her finely chiseled 
features and her naive expression remind 
us of those distractingly genteel ladies of 
yester-year. 

Helen McNutt 

"Lucky Day." 
Because Helen possesses the must dra- 
matic voice of Tubman, it was a "lucky 
day" when she became a member of the 
Dramatic Club. She is one of the few girls 
who will argue with a teacher — so here's 
to our future lawyer! 

Georgia Neal 

"Georgia." 
Georgia, like a Dresden China Shepherd- 
ess, is so small and precious that everyone 
instinctively loves her. 

Neville North 
"Hallelujah." 
When your prince charming (of course 
we mean "of Wales'') comes along, we 
hope he will love you as much as we do, 
Xeville, and be able to appreciate the clever, 
interesting prize he has won ! 

Isabel Ogilvie 

"Coming Thru the Rye." 
Izzy's Scotch brogue is particularly en- 
joyable when she reads Burns' poetry. She 
has all the charm of a character from Bar- 
rie. 

Carolyn Owens 

"Tliat's 11 'hy I Lore }'ou.'' 
Why does evervone love Carolyn? Be- 
cause she has a disposition that lends itself 
to every mood except — anyway Carolyn just 
won't fuss. 

Marion Page 
"Drink to Mc Only With Thine Hyes." 
We have the habit of looking for IMarion's 
dark eyes and curly black hair in any Tub- 
man group that treads a light measure or 
trolls a gay tune. 

Mildred Pardue 
"Those Eyes, Those Eyes. Those Wonderful 
Eyes." 
They belong to Mildred who, we under- 
stand, can use them, too — for many have 
fallen beneath their spell. 

Zella Mae Pearson 

"That Certain Party." 
Zella Mae is "that certain party" who. 
besides an appalling knowledge of French 
verbs, has decided domestic tendencies. You 
rememljer that she walked off with one of 
the sewing prizes. 



18 



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Frances Pierce 

",/;«/ So Do llcr Sislcrs and llcr Cousins 
and Her Aunts." 
Ill fact, everybodj' loves our Frances, 
wlio swims like a sea-nymph ami dances 
like a faun. 

N.AOMI POMERANCE 
"Daz^'u of Toniorroz^:" 
Naomi never waits till the "dawn of to- 
morrow'' to prepare her lessons. She studies 
hard every afternoon; therefore she always 
.<eems to have on the tip of her tongue the 
right answer to all the hardest questions. 

Anna Kate Rhodes 
"Side by Side." 
Anna Kate is a good friend to have by 
our side to help us through the tedium of 
lessons. Her sunny disposition would dis- 
pel any gloom cloud. 

Esther Rock 
"The Maiden's Prayer.'' 
If our guess is right, E.sther's prayer is 
to finish her studying and become a book- 
keeper. 

Jean Rogers 

"My Jean." 
Witty, clever, cute, and absolutely orig- 
inal — that's Jean ! Her work in the Junior 
play shows that in the near future the Amer- 
ican stage will have another great come- 
dienne. 

Ruth Roesel 
"Sister Ruth." 
We can always count on the warm- 
hearted loyaltj' of Ruth, who lends her able 
support to whatever the class of '28 under- 
takes. 

Leah Rosenthal 

"Rio Rita." 
Leah has all the fire and dash of a 
diminutive Spanish maiden. She plays the 
piano, tennis, and bridge — when she isn't 
studying. 

Elizabeth Rountree 
"Crinoline Days." 
For no reason particularly, Elizabeth re- 
minds us of befo' de war. and almost any 
day we expect to see her and Mr. Garrett 
dancing the minuet around Diana. Her 
spunk and sense of argument make her a 
joy forever in history class. 

Dor ETTA Russell 

"Give a Man a Horse He Can Ride." 

But Doretta can ride anything. She 

seems a veritable Peter Pan on horseback 

when she comes cantering down the street. 

Julia Sanders 

"Sailing." 
Julia is just hoping that too manj' storms 
won't blow "ere Jack comes home again." 




19 



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Elise Sanders 
"Rciiu'inbcr." 
We still remember Elise if she did leave 
us in February, because her sweet disposi- 
tion made a lasting impression. 

Eloise Sanders 
"Talking to the Moon." 
Eloise is rather fond of talking, espe- 
cially to the moon — because there is a man 
in it, they say. 

Grace Seals 

"Just IVond'ring." 

We are just wondering if Grace isn't go- 
ing to make us proud of her some day for 
her skill at playing the pipe-organ, 

Helen Smith 

"Five Foot Tzvo." 
"Dumps" may be Lilliputian in stature 
hut when it conies to brains, personality, 
and popularity, she is colossal. 

Mary Spaulding 

"Cargo of Dreams." 
Mary's ship came in, laden with a cargo 
of blonde beauty, brains, and ability. 

Ruby Steele 
"Blue Eyes." 
We can penetrate Ruby's steel-blue eyes 
and see in her heart the love she holds for 

us. 

Sally Stewart 

"// Yon Sec Sally," 

She will probably be doing something 

original like editing a paper or reading a 

deep, deep classic. Every one envies Sally 

her new home in Honolulu. 

Merle Stockton 

"Hot-sy Tot-sy." 
Everything will be hot-sy tot-sy with 
.Merle when her ambition to be a nurse is 
realized. She adds that this will not inter- 
fere with her good times. 

Margaret Stokes 

"Pretty Little Baby. Fm in Love With 
Will." 

Margaret is so pretty and appealing that 
everyone falls in love with her at first sight. 

Carrie Stoniker 

"Pretty Little Tiling." 
Every pretty, demure blonde ought to be 
a graceful dancer, and Carrie really is one. 



20 



Norma Thomas 

"Tiiig-a-liiiii." 

We prophesy that Norma will soon be 
heeding the bells that have lured other.- 
away — and his name is George. 

EvELYX Towxs 

"Bobbin' About." 
Evelyn's always "bobbin' about" from one 
place to another. The uncertainty of her 
next location make,^ her rather tantalizing. 

AxxE Wall.^ce 

"S'L^'Ccllicart of Sigma Clii." 
"The blue of her eyes and the gold of 
her hair" are only two explanations for 
everj'one's loving soft-voiced Anne. We 
don't blame the boys. 

Delle Waltox'^ 

"At the Gym." 
Some day we wouldn't be surprised t(i 
hear that Delle has eclipsed Charley Pad- 
dock's record for sprinting, because she 
has literally parked in the Gj-m and on thf 
track at Tubman in her spare moments. 

Axxie K.ate Ward 
"Tillic the Toiler" 
She left us in February to become some- 
body's "Stenog." We hear that she has 
had much luck. 

Axxa Kate Weathers 
"Come Out, Mr. Snnsliiiie." 
The weather's always fair when Anna 
Kate appears, for she is not only amiable 
but dependable. 

Audrey White 

"/;( a Little Sfa"'^'h Tovjii." 
Audrej' has endeared herself to us not 
merely by her ready wit, but by her talents 
in literature and art, which have absorbed 
quite a Spanish flavor. 

Nellie Wilheit 

''Nellie IVas a Lady." 

Unlike the song, last night she didn't die. 

but last year she came to Tubman. She 

was an instantaneous success, and aren't wc 

glad she came? 

Margaret Wolfe 
".1/y Little Dream Girl." 
She's dainty, she's tiny, she's modest (you 
should see her blush), she's most lovable. 
Isn't she a Dream Girl? 

Sarah Yearty 
"Sarah, Come Over Here." 
Of course, we say this whenever we see 
Sarah, and we also want to add that other 
line, "Sarah, oh. you're a dear." 




21 



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Second Term Seniors 




OFFICERS 



Leslie ]\Iiller 



Prcsifl( lit 



LuLA McKellar J'ice-Pn-siilenI 



Alice Landrum 



Secretin y anil Treasurer 



Motto: "B\ 



Leslie Miller 
President 



Colors: Yelloiv and If kite. F!.o\\er: Df:fcd/I. 



Laura Akerman 
Matilda Allen 
Anna Averhuck 
Elva Babbitt 
Sue Walker Bailie 
1\Larv Balk 
Martha Baxle^' 
Mary Alice Beasley 
Ruby Cain 
Margaret Caldwell 
Natalie Churchill 
Thelma Dye 
Frances Etheridge 
GussiE Goldstein 
Mattie Goss 
Vera Hamilton 
Ossie Hancock 
Sabina Hayes 
Earline Holmes 
Emma Hughes 
I\ La rg A r et Hundley 



Elenka Jackson 
Blanche Johnson 
Elizabeth Johnson 
Frances Jones 
Theo Kelly 
Julia Krewson 
Alice Landrum 
Doris Langley 
Dorothy Lansdell 
Virginia Lee 
Leslie Miller 
Frankie Moring 
Mildred McCormick 
LuLA McKellar 
Dorothy (TNeal 
Ethel Ray 

Kathleen Rheinwalt 
IVLary Stone 
MvRA Thomas 
Cathleen Toole 
Anna Elese Wolfe 



22 



XKi 



-MO «»- IVXJUX 



y ^f^yipipiiipipy^if <P H P'>!r''^^- ^ ^F'P¥^pi i" piiii^<pi py <'^P<' ^ ¥i 



Second Term Seniors 

L. Akermax M. Allen- A. Averruck S. W. Bailie M. Balk 

'M. Baxley N. Churchill T. Dye M. Goss \'. Hamilton 

O. Haxcock S. Hayes E. Hughes E. Jacksox F. Jones 

T. Kelly A. Laxdrum D. Lausdell V. Lee L. ^[iller 

M. ]\IcCoRMiCK E. Ray A. E. Wolfe 




23 



"The Black and Gold" 

\oir He'll sire a cheer for Tubiiuiu, 
For the school ive love the most! 
Evermore ue sint; her praises, 
Anil her iK.iiie sh/ill lie our boast. 
To the top -cie'll raise her colors, 
J nd her staiiilards ever hold. 
Then let lis i'/zr a roiisini^ cheer 
For the 1 iihiiian black and t;old. 
Then h t us ^ive a rousinv cheer 
For the Tubman black and gold. 

CHORUS 

So with voices loud and strong, 

7 her name 'iic raise a song, 

For to her our hearts belong. 

If itii a love untold. 

Then ive'll cheer for Tubman High! 

May her spirit never die; 

J ictorious may fly 

Dear old black and gold. 

— Words by Velma Bell, '25. 



24 




JAPAN 




J 



Juniors 




OFFICERS 

Dorothy Pierce President 

Mary Watkins Vice-President 

Agnes Story Secretary o Treasurer 



Marv Branch 
Margaret Buckhai.tek 
Pearl Burnette 
Helen Callahan 
Maule Carl 
Elizabeth Carroll 
Evelyn Clary 
Lucille Corbett 
Blanche Crawford 

CORINNE CrICKENBERGER 

Robbie Ci'lpepper 
Dorothy Delph 
Mary Dennis 
F^.etty Dunbar 
Dorothy' Durst 
Margaret Edmunds 
Margaret Elliott 
Ellen Emigh 
Katie Evans 
Mary Fields 
Louise Ford 
Rosa Lee Ford 
Frances Forney 
Virginia Fulcher 
Anna Goodwin 
Elizabeth Gordon 
Dorothy Grimes 
Margaret Hardy 
Lucille Heath 
Ruth Heath 
Katherine Heffernan 
Ruth Hill 



Reby Anderson 
Ida Lee Ballentine 
Doza Beane 
Margaret Bell 
Edmunda Hine 
Naomi Holley 
Emily Holman 
Lalla Hunter 
Anita James 
Ollie James 
CoRRiE Johnson 
Fannie Johnson 
Jean Jones 
Ruth Knowles 
Ll'cille Lamb 
Ollie Lamhack 
Mary Alice Legwen 
Emma Lester 
Thelma Levy 
Jacqi-elin Marshall 
Ardene Mershon 
Marjorie Mesnard 
Mary John Metcalfe ■• 
Lucille Meyers 
Elizabeth Mitchlim 
Mildred Moore 
Julia Morris 
RLargaret Move 
Margaret Mui.lix 
Lois McCoy 
Lyda Mae McCoy 
Josephine McCrary 
LuLA McKeli.ar 
Marguerite McKinney 
Mary Neal 
Marguerite Pardi'e 
Mary Parks 
Derrille Partain 
Beauford Partridge 
Mary Peacock 
Dorothy Pearson 
Dorothy Pierce 
Edna Plunkett 
IsABELLE Plunkett 
Josephine Plunkett 
Emmie Lee Pollard 



Robbie Prescott 

Maurine Purcell 

Syble Reeves 

Nell.s Rennison 

Jane Richardson 

Mary Constance Richardson 

Geneva Rigsby 

Margaret Rockwell 

Evelyn Roesel 

Catherine Roessler 

Virginia Sack 

Helen Schley 

Margaret Skinner 

Effie Spradley 

Louise Sprouse 

Marie Stevens 

Mabel Stokes 

Dorothy Stockton 

Corinne Stone 

Agnes Story 

Katharine Sullivan 

Alice Sumerau 

Lucille Suther 

Margaret Tempi.eton 

Virginia Thomas 

Myrtle Thompson 

Betty Tommins 

Sarah Traylor 

Nan Trowbridge 

Marian Twiggs 

Gertri'de Verderv 

lu.IZARETH VoRHAUER 

Anna Wagnon 
Irene Walker 
Martha Walker 
Emily Ware 
Mary Watkins 
Ruth Weeks 
Esther Weinstein 
Inez Whaley 
Alma Williams 
SuDiE Boye Williams 
Mozelle Winter 
Doris Wolfe 
Roberta Young 



20 



^tD!» JftH: 



AIX 



Juniors 



I. L. Bai.lentixe 


E. 


Carroll 


D. 


Durst 


D. Beane 


E. 


Clar^- 


M 


Elliott 


M. Bell 


L. 


CORBETT 


E. 


Emigh 


M. BR.ANCH 


B. 


Crawforu 


L. 


Ford 


P. BURXETTE 


C. 


Crickenberger 


F. 


Forney 


R. Cain 


R. 


Culpepper 


V. 


FULCHER 


H. Callahan 


D. 


Delph 


A. 


Goodwin 


M. Carl 


M 


. Dennis 


D. 


Grimes 


H. Carrigan 


B. 


Dunbar 


M 


Hardy 




27 






Juniors 



L. Heath 
R. Heath 
K. Hefferxan 

E. HiNE 
N. HOLLEY 

L. Hunter 
A. James 

F. Johnson 
J. Jones 



R. Knowles 
O. Lam BACK 
M. A. Legwen 
E. Lester 
T. Levy 
J. ALarshall 
A. Mershon 
M. J. Metcalfe 
J. Morris 



J. McCrary 
L. McKellar 

I\L McKlNNEY 

M. Pardue 
IVL Peacock 
D. Pearson 
D. Pierce 
J. Plunkett 
R. Prescott 




28 



u 



l-iA-tos jtMD xw ivuvm: 



y PyPP^'P^lii 



^^^yy^^^lP^^^tP^^P 



Juniors 



J. RiCHARDSOX 

M. C. Richardson 

C. ROESSLER 

V. Sack 

H. SCHLEV 

M. Skixner 
M. Stevens 
M. Stokes 
C. Stone 



A. Story 
L. Suther 

M. Templeton 
V. Thomas 
M. Thompson 

B. Tom M INS 

S. TRA'iLOR 

N. Trowbridge 
M. Twiggs 



G. Verderv 
E. Vorhauer 
A. Wagnon 
M. Walker 
E. Ware 
M. Watkins 
E. Weinstein 
I. Whaley 
A. Williams 




29 



'US^^ 




j^ 'pyy^^<p^iF % 




Sophomores 



OFFICERS 

J OS E PH I X E Fry Pres'ulen t 

Sarah Doughty J "ice-President 

Mariox Neely Secretary o Treasurer 



Abbertine, M. 
Antopolske, 1£. 

ASHLEV, M. 

ashmore, e. 
ashmore. s. 
Bailie, E. 
Baird. E. 

l^.ALLENTTNE. U. 

Bates, C. 
Batten, H. 
Bearden, E. 
Eeasley, L. 
Eentlev. D. 
Binns, E. 
Booze, P. 
Bowden, M. 

BOWEN, M. 

Bowen, S. 
Brenner, L. 
Brittain. M. ^ 
Bryngelson. S. 

BUGG. G. 

Bunch, C. 
Bunch. M. 
Burton. R. 
Butler, H. 
Carroll. B. 
Carstarphen. M. 
Chapman, M. 
Chavous, H. 
Cheeks, O. 
Clark, T. 
cogburn, c. 
Cole. E. 
Coke. M. 
Cowan. B. 
Creed. M. 
Dansby. L. 
Day, si. 
Devereaux, a. 

DODD. M. 

dorrill. jm. 
Doughty. S. 
DuuiG. E. 
Eaves, \". 
Ellis. B. L. 
Farmer, F. 
Ferramosca. E. 
Fitzgerald. C. 
Freeman. H. 
French, A. 
Fry. T. 
Garten, F. 
Garvin, G. 



Gercke, E. 

(ilBSON, L. 

Gleason, Z. A. 
Goldman, M. 
goodson, c. 
Goodwin, H. 
Graham, C. 
Grear, R. 
Green, M. F. 
Greene, O. 
Greiner. E. 
Grimaud, M. L. 
Haggerty, M. 
Halford. a. 
Hall. V. 
Hallman, M. 
Hamilton, E. 
Hanahon. E. W. 
>Tarlev, H. 
Harris, C. 
Harrison. H. 
Hayes, M. 
Heath, G. 
Henderson. \\ 
Henslv, Ar. 
Henson. i\r. 

HiLDERBRANT, L. 

Hoffman. E. 
Hoffman, L. 

HOGAN. M. 
HOLL, E. 

Hood. 'S\. 
Horne, R. 
Howard, A. 
Hughes, L. 
Hunter, S. 
Hutcheson. H. 

IVEY. E. 

Jackson. E. 
James, M. E. 
James, W. 
Jansen, M. 
Jarrell, M. M. 
Jarret, jM. 
Jennings. I. 
Jernigan. G. 
Johnson. V. 

JON'ES, K. 

Kennedy, M. 
Kitchens, G. 
Knight, L. 
Krewson, a. 
Lazenbv, F. 



Eeaptrotte. K. 
Levkoff, E. 
Lombard, M. 

LORICK, M. 

Lynn, J. 
Mackey, H. 
Maddox, N. 
Mallard, S. 
Maloney, H. 
Mason, L. 
Meredith, L. 
Mertine. E. 
Mills, L. 
Milton, C. 
Montgomery. K. 
Montgomery, 1'. 
Moore, E. 
Move, J. 
Mover, 'S. M. 
Mulligan, L. 
Murphy, G. 
Murphy, M. 
McGahee, O. 
McKie, C. 
McLendon. L. 
McNaughton, Z. a. 
McPhail. B. 
Neelv, M. 
Nelson, H. 
NowELL, r>. 
Olofsox, G. 
O'Neal. H. 
Otwell, M. 
Palmer, M. 
Pardue. S. M. 
Patche, a. 
Pearlstein. F. 
I'earsox, M. 
Phillips, F. 
Pitts, E. 
Pollard, I. L. 
Ponder, O. 
Potter, K. 
Powell. D. 
Powell, E. 
Prichard. E. 
Rainwater, V. 
Rearden. D. 
Reese. S. 
Reeves. E. 
Reeves. J. 
Reynolds, S. 
Rice, E. 



RoBERTSiiM. A. 

Robinson, F. 
Rogers, E. 
Rosier, E. 
Ruben stein. M. L. 
Sancken, C. 
Satcher, E. 
Schwitzerlet, a. 
Scott, F. 
Scott, L. 
Shapiro. E. 
Sharp, D. 
Sharp, M. 
Sheftall, a. 
Sheppard, M. 
Silas, L. 
Smith, M. 
Snider, C. 
Southall, E. 
Stark, M. 
Story, D. 
Story, M, E. 
Summerau, \'. 
Taggart, J. 
Tavlor, C. 
Tavl'ir. H. 
Tavlor, L. 
Templeton, H. 
Thomas. L. 
Thurmund. M. 
Tidwell. M. 
\'eno. E. 
\'erdel. L. 
\'erdery, C. 
Wagnon. E. 
Walker, H. 
Wallace. A, 
Walters. B. 
Ware, L. 
Watson, J. 
Weatherhorn, J. 
Webb. E. 
West. E. 
Wilkinson, E. 
Wilkinson, D. 
Williams. V.. 
Williams, R. 
Williamson. M, 
Willis. A. 

WiNGO. M. 

Winter, "SI. 

Wolfe, D. 
Youngblood, ^^. 
Zealy. S. 



32 



f ^yy y p^ 



-l/^.ll>s *tin> .»" jvtjv»jc 



Freshmen 



c ackerman 
g adams 
1 adams 
d allgood 
f allgood 
g allgood 
a anderson 
1 angelakos 
c b atkinson 
m avrett 
m bacon 
p bacon 
c bailie 
i banks 
e barksdale 
I barksdale 
s j barksdale 
li barnard 
n bar ret t 
j beatse 
1 bates 
w ben son 
a bent ley 
d bentiey 
b biggar 
c 1 binns 
1 blackstone 
e I blum 
m bobler 
b bowles 
e bowyer 
e bradley 
g brantley 
m brown 
m n brown 
1 buck 
1 bug? 
a burton 
c burton 
c byrd 
r byrd 
e cadle 
m Campbell 
a Carroll 
b carswel! 
n cbandler 
p cheeks 
V dark 
d cloud 
s cohen 
s cole 
e coleman 
e coUins 
w Conner 
d cook 
e conk 
1 cook 
b cooper 
m f copeland 
e Cranston 
s crosson 
e crouch 
m cr'mi;-'er 
e daly 
m dalv 
e daniel 
f davenport 
f davis 
f davis 
m davis 



f deniedicis 
h derrick 

V doolittle 
a dorn 

a drost 
e duke 
m dukes 
c dunn 
1 durliam 
e durst 
e dye 
r edmunds 
I ed wards 

V edwins 
ni egbert 
p eidsoii 
e elkins 
r epps 

e ergle 
1 ernest 
h evans 
1 evans 
m eselle 
e farris 
a fike 
e fleming 
1 flint 
m fooslie 
e forbes 
a ford 
f fox 

V fox 

ra freeman 
i fursc 

V gi>rdner 
e gibbs 

k gibson 

! glover 

m goodman 

e graves 

e greene 

e greene 

1 greene 

b h agger ty 

o hair 

m harbin 

e harris 

m harveston 

o heath 

f henderson 

m henry 

s herndon 

m e hill 

f hogan 

r hollingsworth 

s holman 

e home 

a howe 

r huff 

a humphrevs 

d huntingdon 

a hynes 

h inglet 

e ivey 

m ivey 

c izlar 

b e James 

jeffcoat 

V jeffcoat 

1 Johnson 



tn Johnson 
d Jones 
m b Jones 
j Jordan 
1 Jordan 
s joyner 
m keel 
k keenan 
a kellogg 
1 king 
a n kirsch 
p juehnel 
m lamkin 
j leaptrotte 
1 lewis 
f logan 
e logue 
r loyal 
c lundy 
a marsh 
e maxwell 
f menger 
m menger 
h mesnard 
a moore 
m morgan 
c morton 
p murpliy 
r murphy 
a 1 murrah 
1 murral 
1 mccormick 
n mcdonald 
j mcintyre 

nelson 
m oden 

d oellreich 
f o'hara 
j owens 
m padgett 
b palmer 

1 partridge 
1 Patterson 
1 pearlstein 
j perry 

m a phillipa 
e pickett 
m pierce 
m pitts 
f poss 
m poston 
g prescott 
r prescott 
e price 
m price 
a printup 
c purvis 
e rae 
1 readdy 
m rearden 
m a rearden 
m 1 reddic 
a reese 
t reese 
m risinger 
h reynolds 
v reynolds 
m rezner 
a m rhodes 
e rhodes 



V m rhodes 
\v rhodes 

v richardson 
e riley 
m rivers 
1 roberson 
e m rosier 
m rucker 
r sammons 
m satcher 
m savage 
m saxon 
m f scharff 
m schley 
h schwitzerlet 
m scott 
m scott 
ni scott 
e seage 
r siegier 
r senn 
s sheahan 
m Sherman 
d shi{ip 
r smitherman 
h snellgrove 
e speering 
r speering 

stone 

V stone 

f sumerau 

m 1 swancy 

a Swindell 

e sykes 

f taggart 

w 1 takersley 

e taylor 

t thompson 

e thurmond 

a todd 

m e tomiin 

1 toole 
e tudor 
h turner 
m usry 

V Vaughn 
m vawter 
b wade 

I walden 
s walden 
c walder 
m walder 
h wall 

m m waiters 
m weidner 
f weinstein 
m w ha ley 
d whatley 
r white 
a Wiggins 
r Williams 
s Williams 
1 wiison 
I wiison 
r wiison 
i wood 
g wren 
m wren 
I waytt 
1 youngblood 



33 



~>& jxMO .n- xvuma 



y¥¥'pyip^^ i '¥¥< r^^w T'»^^i>^fPf ^^ ii^fP^y^^^' f" 





34 







MHilll 




SrlA-irt^ /ctm A. IVUFLNC 



JiVVVV 



^iP^ l Py^^^r^F^^P^P'P^'PP^^^ 



^^^ y 



Annual Staff 

Sarah Bright Gracev Editor-in-Chief 

Martha Walker Junior Assistant 

Betty Jones Business Manager 

Mary Watkixs Junior Assistant 

Linda Davidson Literary Editor 

Louise Ford Junior Assistant 

Mary Marsh Art Editor 

Jane Richardson Junior Assistant 

Harriet Garrett Athletic Editor 

Lucille Heath Junior Assistant 

Mabelle Cartledce Picture Editor 

Corinne Stone Junior Assistant 

Miss Wickliffe Faculty Advisor 




36 



jfiAxn^ fiMo 



f lPyyy^PP'P^^^y^^yyy 



^ IP^P^y^^^P P i 



Exemption Girls 



I\Iari,\m Avkett 
Sue W. Bailie 
Eleanor Bixxs 
GoLiiiE Bkantlev 
Bektha Cakswell 

AlDREV DllRX 

Betty Dl'.nt.ar 
Elizabeth Elkixs 
Lai'ra Evans 
Frances Fornev 
Josephine Fry 
Sarah B. Gkacev 
RvTH Grear 



LiiiLLE Heath 
Martha Henry 
Maiiei- Hill 
-\lke Howe 
Carolyn Izlar 
Berdie I{. James 
W'ynona James 
Dorothy Jones 
Jessie Jordan 
Ruth Knowles 
LoL'isE King 
Alice Lanurum 
Elizabeth Lockhart 

RosK W 



J A cu c el I N ]■: Marshall 
Hoi'E Mesnakii 
Mary J, Metcalfe 
Anna MoNT('.oMEK^■ 
Alice Moore 
Anne Marsh 
Matilda Otwell 
Lois Partridge 
Mary Peacock 
Zella Mae Pearson 
Mary A. Phillips 
JMarian Pierce 
Naomi Pomerance 
ILsny 



Lcch.e Readdy 
Helen Reynolds 
Mary C. Richardson 
Mary F. Schakff 
Amelia Sheftall 
Helen Smith 
Sally Stewart 
Betsy Taft 
Theopie Thompson 
Marjorie Tidvvell 
Clara Verdery 
Carolyn Walker 
Martha Walker 




37 





Dramatic Club 



Miss Boatwright 



SPONSORS 
Miss Eve 
Miss Braddy 



Miss Wickliffe 



Miss Eve 

Marian Browne 
Lois Dansbv 
Linda Davidson 
Dorothy Durst 
Ellen Emigh 
Harriet Fiske 
Frances Forney 
Virginia Fulchek 
Harriet Garrett 
Margaret Halliian 
Lucille Heath 



LuLISE Hilderbrant 
Mabel Hill 
Eleanor Binns 

GiRZELDA ARNETTE 

Anna Averbuck 
Eleanor Bearden 
Betty Biggar 
Ethel Hoffman 
Margaret Hundley 
^L\UDIE Mae Jarrell 
Caroline Jarreti 

ESTELLE LeVKOFF 

Dorothy Jones 
Betty Jones 
Billy Kelly 
Elizabeth Lam back 
Marian Layton 
Mary Masuk 
Evelyn McColloch 
Helen McNutt 
Marguerite McKinnev 
Anna Montgomery 



Georgia Neal 
Alice Patche 
Dorothy Pearson 
Zella Mae Pearson 
Dorothy Pierce 
Frances Pierce 
Josephine Plunkett 
Naomi Pomerance 
Mary C. Richardson 
Catherine Roessler 
Jean Rogers 
Leah Rosenthal 
Vera Shimoff 
Margl:erite Stark 
Sally Stewart 
Mabel Stokes 
Margaret Stokes 
CoRiNNE Stone 
Irene Walker 
Audrey White 
Nellie Wilheit 
Doris Wolfe 




38 




Glee Club 



Miss Halbert 



Sue W. Bailie 
Mary Clark 
Martha Dorn 
Sarah B. Gracey 
Mabel Hill 
Norma House 
Katharine Hull 
Betty Jones 
Dorothy Jones 
Alice Landrum 
Dorothy Mixon 
Anna Montgomery 
Martha Murphey 



Director 



Helen McNutt 
Georgia Neal 
Neville North 
Marion Page 
Frances Pierce 
Frances Reid 
Mary C. Richardson 
Catherine Roessler 
Leah Rosenthal 
Helen Smith 
Corinne Stone 
Anne Wallace" 
Ethel Wilkerson 




Miss Halbert 




39 






*^ pip^^Pi 




Athletic Council 



Frances Pierce President 

Harriet Garrett lice-President 

Maudie Mae JaRRELL Secretary 

Dorothy Pierce Treasurer 

Sally Stewart Senior Representative 

Lucille Heath Junior Representative 

Madge Jansen Sophomore Representative 

Rose Wilson Fresh/nan Representative 

Sue W. Bailie Half Advanced Senior Representative 

Miss Null Faculty Representative 

Miss Ann Wilson Physical Director 

Miss Wickliffe Physical Director 




40 



V "V "w' "i^p'i ' ^- " ■ -^ 




Senior Basket-Bali Team 





Harriet Garrett, Captain 




Fonvards- 




Centers 


Guards 


C. Jarrett 




H. Garrett 


D. Jones 


F. Pierce 




A. Harley 


M. Laird 


S. Stewart 




A. K. Weathers 


C. Owens 


s 


enior 


Hockey 1 earn 




R. Brisexdine 




D. Jones 


L. McKenzie 


H. Garrett 




M. Kelly 


F. Pierce 


S. B. Gracey 




M. Laird 


N. POMERANCE 


A. Harlev 




A. Montgomery 


L. Rosenthal 


M. HOLLEY 






S. Stewart 




41 



sru^ 



'^'"V" 




Junior Basket-Bail Team 





hv< 


ciLLE Heath, 


a 


a p tain 




Forwards 




Venters 






Guards 


A. ]V1ershon 




D. Pierce 






L. Heath 


M. Watkins 




E. Ware 






R. Knowles 



Junior Hockey Team 



D. Beane 
H. Carrigan 

E. Emigh 

V. FULCHER 





L. 


Heath 




E. 


Hixe 




R. 


Knowles 




A. 


Mershon 


■^ 




WHBi 


^ 




WK 


--^^^ 



D. Pearson 
D. Pierce 
J. Plunkett 
M. Watkins 




42 




Sophomore Basket Ball Team 



Foruar/ls 
B. Cowan 
V. Hall 
M. Neelv 
I. L. Pollard 



Mae WiXGO, Ctif>taiii 
Centers 
K. Leaptrotte 
S. Reynolds 

M. WiNGO 



Guards 
M. Jansen 
M. M. Jarrell 



Sophomore Soccer Team 



E. Bearden 
M. Chapman 
S. Doughty 
V. Eaves 

J. Clark 



J. Fry 

M. F. Green 

W. James 

Substitutes 



G. Kitchens 
H. Nelson 
A. Templeton 

M. WiNGO 



R. Grear 




43 




Freshman Basket-Bail Team 



Fonctmis 


Centers 


Guards 


E. Cadle 


E. Rice 


C. Morton 


F. deMedicis 


E. Taylor 


M. Pierce 


B. E. James 


R. Wilson 


E. Speering 


J. Leaftrotte 




R. Williams 


Freshman Soccer Team 


C. Bailie 


J. Leai'trotte 


E. Rice 


H. Barnard 


K. Leaftrotte 


E. Speering 


L. Flint 


M. Pierce 


E. Taylor 


B. E. James 


Substitutes 


R. Wilson 


A. Ford 


K. Gibson 

\4idgets 


C. Morton 




44 




v* 



inoin 



Features 




Margaret Stokes 

"Prettiest" 
America 



Anne Wallace 

''Prettiest'^ 
America 




Harriet Garr^^ 

"Host Athletic 
Japan 




♦ vv 



// 



Sarah Bright Gracey 

Host Intcllectital'^ 
Roumania 






Class History 



, The author omits apologies to John Biinyan since this work can in no way be compared 

with his.) 



fi 



ROM the Land of Ignorance a great band of Little People did gather at 
a place called Tubman. Although they did come from widely scattered 
parts of the country and from different classes and conditions of Life, they 
did have two points of similarity: first, they were clothed in raiment, the 
which was diverse at the top but identical at the bottom, in that it reached barely 
to the kriees and was undivided ; secondly, each did complain bitterly of a burden 
she carried on her back, the which was called the Necessity of Gaining Knowledge, 
until the air was made heavy with the cries and lamentations of them. And to 
them in their distress came a man who was to lead them, and this man's name was 
Integrity. Integrity did summon luito him many assistants who resembled the 
Little People in that they w ore the same abbreviated apparel and did complain loudly 
of a burden the name of which was the Necessity of Imparting Knowledge. And 
Integrity spake unto them, saying, "I have chosen thee for the leading of this band 
of Little People on a quest for Education, the which will last four years. Each 
year shall ye traverse a different land, at the boundaries whereof there are barriers 
that be high and wide and strong, and the name of the barriers is examinations. And 
no person shall avoid these barriers or go around them but must surmount them, each 
in his turn. It will be your dut\- to provide these Little People with material with 
which thev may build themselves a ladder to climb these walls." To these words 
the\ made no answer, only they looked upon each other and did nod gravely. And 
so it came to pass that the Little Pe('ple entered upon the first stage of their journev, 
the which was named the 

FRESHMAN STAGE. 

And they did skip merrily along until they drew nigh to a very miry bog, and 
they, being heedless, did fall suddenly into the Slough of Schedules. And they 
\\ere sore amazed. They lifted up their voices and called for the assistants and 
the assistants did turn back to them, extend to them helping hands and did draw 
them from the Slough. Now as the Little People went on, they came to a little ascent. 
Up there, therefore, the Little People went, and they made a great gazing on a 
verdant valley of English, across which they did see the sunny meadow s of Literature. 
Then they were glad and lightsome and did hasten forward with merry hearts because 
it did seem a familiar way, but soon they did stumble over Prepositional Objectives 
and were torn by thorns of verbals. They were grievously harassed. They shrank 
back aff^righted at the gloomy depths of the Forest of Algebra for they feared its un- 
known quantities. Now they were come to that wall of Examinations of which 
Integrity had bid them beware, and some did fail to mount the barrier, but the 
rest did ascend successfully though their cries did increase and the weight of their 
burdens did lie hard upon them. Thus they did come into the 



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SOPHOMORE STAGE. 

By this time the\" had got to the deep dark chasm, the name of which was 
General Science. After they did emerge from this thej- did separate and take 
different courses and each group did have several assistants to guide it. The group 
\\hich did follow the Classical Course did come upon a road called Latin. This was 
an uphill path where the\' did have to crawl o\er the Crevices of Conjugations, 
tra\erse trails of Translation and struggle over the pointed peaks of Prose. One 
band of Little People did take a treacherous course called Commercial, where thej' 
did have to translate their maps from a code called Shorthand, and then had to 
figure out each step before the)' made it. Still another group took a course called 
]\Iodern Language, on the which there uere many pitfalls and quagmires. And 
so they were come for a second time to the barrier of Examinations and thus passed 
unto the 

JUNIOR STAGE 

where they entered upon new paths. In one of these they did become lost in a 
lab3Tinth named Geometry where they worked in circles, and the path had many 
sharp angles and devious windings which led them over a hill called Demonstration 
to a solution of their problems. The Little People were rejoiced that the^- had 
come thus far on their journey in safety and they did hold a pageant, the which 
was called Pickles. Many people came together from foreign lands to witness this, 
and there was much music and laughter, and the pageant did last two nights and 
one day. And the Little People chanced to look up, and lo, they were disporting 
themselves in the shadow of the third barrier of Examinations. Some of the Little 
People did fail to mount this barrier and returned to the land whence they had 
come, but the rest passed into the 

SENIOR STAGE. 

All this time they were beset by many evils. Sharp arrows called Demerits were 
rained upon them and small round bullets called Zeros mowed them down. They 
did constantly have to dodge the quicksands called Flunks, and often they were 
halted in their course by beasts named Tests. These they passed without a mar, 
however. Running parallel to their course was one named Culture Course, whereat 
they were given occasional respite from their burdens and were allowed to quaff 
of the refreshing spring called Harmony. And so at last they came to the end of 
their journey and did clamber over the third and last wall into the outside world 
where they did drop their burdens. And, alas, they found that without the balance 
of these burdens they could make no further progress and they did raise their voices 
unto Integrity and beg him to give back the burdens and they would bear them 
right willingly. They cried unto him that they did now understand that Education 
was not a goal to be attained, but was a beacon which would guide them along 
pleasant and delightful paths to the end of LIFE. 



51 



i ip i pHpUP | p' i| p' < p ip ^ | > l (p J : 



Last Will and Testament 

STATE OF GEORGIA, 
COUNTY OF RICHMOND. 

^-^-^E, the Senior Class of Tubman High School, 1928, City of Augusta, County 
^ I ^ of Richmond, State of Georgia, being weak and feeble in body, yet sound 
\ M r and disposing mind and memory and realizing the proximity of dissolu- 
^•^•^ tion, do hereby, for the purpose of making known our wishes after the last 
sad rites have been performed over our remains, declare and ordain this to be our last 
will and testament. 

After earnest search for a person of responsibility, we have chosen Miss Latham 
as sole executor of this will, as we feel confident that she can be relied upon to carry 
out all the details. 

Item i. We hereby bequeath to our beloved principal, Mr. T. H. Garrett, 
two pennies, one street car ticket, one Bobby pin and other remaining "LOST" 
articles in the office — an initial fund for promoting future "Culture Courses." 

Item 2. To Miss Ingram, we give, bequeath and devise one automatic paper 
grading machine, guaranteed to take care of the overflow that usually occurs at 
the close of each month. 

Item 3. To Miss Page, we leave one sign reading, "Keep to the Right," as 
"first aid ' at her wonted post. 

Item 4. To Miss Donnelly, Rose Levy bequeaths her lost, strayed or stolen 
vanity case. 

Item 5. We leave Miss ^Vickllffe the position as Chief Executive, realizing 
her ability. 

Item 6. To Miss Halbert, Jean Rogers leaves one sailor — gratis. 

Item 7. To Miss Dudley, her Senior sections leave a set of the novels of 
James Oliver Curwood. 

Item 8. To Miss Norris, her Chemistry sections leave a foot-stamping machine 
for disciplining future classes. 

Item g. To Miss Panebaker, Katharine Hull leaves her expansive smile and 
dulcet giggle. 

Item 10. To Miss Ama Lee Null, we bequeath "A Spanish Cavalier" — timely 
suggestion for an interesting future. 

Item ii. Harriet Garrett leaves to Mrs. (^wens her strong vocal organs, realiz- 
ing that she will have need of them in the future. 

Item 12. Evelyn Towns and Eloise Sanders leave to Miss Comey and Miss 
Hains, their melodious alto voices. 

Item 13. To Miss Boatwright we bequeath one Kress iron savings bank — a 
safe repository for any coins which she may wish to save for future investment in 
United States bonds. 



52 



Item 14. Louise Hardaway bequeaths her confidence in humanity to Miss Lois 
Eve — to use especially in study hall. 

Item 15. To the Juniors who are destined to take the Commercial Course, we 
leave six unabridged dictionaries, and request them to look up every word, when in 
doubt as to the correct spelling, thereby helping to avoid irritating Miss Latham's 
over-wrought nerves. 

Item 16. AVaurega Jackson leaves to Margaret Templeton her curling irons, 
to her own proper use and benefit forever, with full power to dispose of by will or 
otherwise as may seem proper. 

Item 17. Mildred Pardue leaves her curly hair, so orderly arranged, to Mary 
Constance Richardson. 

Item 18. Willie Buck wills her characteristic manner of gum chewing to a 
patronizer of Beech Nut. She considers this a legacy in itself, and hopes the legatee 
will appreciate her generous bestowal. 

Item 19. To forgetful Juniors Wyoma Hobbs lea\es her pocketbook, fully 
equipped with pencils, erasers, hair pins, combs, etc. 

Item 20. Merle Stockton bequeaths her ukelele to her sister, Dorothy, hoping 
that said benefactress can use it in the Instrumental Club. 

Item 21. Shirley Cobb and Billy Kelly leave their gracefulness in dancing to 
Joe Plunkett and Agnes Stor>-. 

Item 22. Mary ]\Iarsh leaves her charming personality and artistic talent to 
Roberta Young. 

Item 23. Mabel Hill leaves to Jane Richardson her love of bugs. 

Item 24, Betty Jones, the "World's Most Famous Chemist," leaves to Mary 
Watkins what is left of her apparatus. 

Item 25. To Margaret Elliott, Nora Lamkin bequeaths her love of philosophy 
and psychology. 

Item 26. Margaret Gilson leaves her ability to "bull" to Dot Pierce. 

Item 27. Sarah Bright Gracey bequeaths her inveterate propensity for being 
right to Louise Ford. 

Item 28. To Mary Alice Legwen, Anna Montgomery bequeaths her beautiful 
picture book of Annapolis. 

Item 29. To those Freshmen who wish to become educated over night, Evelyn 
McColloch leaves the results of her many and varied questions. 

Item 30. Neville North leaves to Dorothy Delph her fear of Miss Page. 

Item 31. Jeanette Anthony wills her astounding knowledge of English and 
Shorthand to Lucille Lamb. 



53 



Item 32. We hereby bequeath to the Seniors of 1929, in a very unreserved 
manner, share and share ah'ke, all other property and effects that we have not specifically 
devised in this, our last will and testament. 

(Signed) THE SENIOR CLASS OF 1928. 

Signed, sealed, declared and published by the Senior Class of 1928, in the presence 
of us, the undersigned, who subscribe our names hereto in the presence of said testator, 
after she had signed her name thereto, and at her special instance and request, and in 
the presence of each other. 

(Testator) : Mabelle Cartledge. 

Witnesses : 

Sally Stewart, 
Neville North. 




54 



Sometime, Somewhere, 
in tlie Future. 



Dear Marv, 



I suppose you remember how hjcal orators used to come to Tubman to speak 
(always on the day we had studj-hall rirst period), and how by coincidence, no 
matter what his subject was, each one seemed to come to the point where he found 
it necessary to declaim, with many gestures, that we were the "future business women, 
home-makers, builders of the nation, — etc., etc." 

Of course, we were alwaj's duly inspired by these oratorical outbursts, but I 
ne\er realized their truth until recently. In an attempt to locate old schoolmates, 
I found instead the artists, scientists, politicians and great women of today. 

What about Sarah Bright Gracey's being elected President? They say that she 
easily defeated all rivals by her extensive knowledge, acquired in history class, of 
"How the President is Nominated and Elected." Another asset was her similarity to 
the former President Coolidge — famous for his few words and upright posture. 

Teety Garrett and Billie Kelly, wearing those enchanting uniforms which they 
used in the Junior play, are now door-keepers at the White House. The Secretary 
of the Navy has further adopted this garb as official for all Admirals, Vice-Admirals 
and Rear-Admirals. 

On account of their love for "dear old Tubman" some of the girls are still 
there. They are efficient young employees. Jeanette Anthony, because of her 
excellent attainments in Business Training, has succeeded Miss Wilson, whom 
matrimony has claimed, as Mr. Garrett's Secretar)'. Ruth, because of her skill in 
filling out a daily report blank, is now with the faculty as an English teacher. 
I\Iargaret Wolfe, whose shorthand notebook is a work of art, is now instructing 
would-be stenographers in the way that they should go. 

Flo Zeigfeld, while attending a charit}- bazaar at the Forrest Hills Ricker, saw 
six beautiful girls doing their bit for the poor. He rushed towards them. Now, 
Marion Page, Marie Laird, Elizabeth Rountree, Nora Lamkin, Mary Joplin and 
Mary Babbitt are in the "Follies." 

Anna iMontgomery is thrilling vast New York audiences by her wonderful 
piano technique. Patty has with her Dorothy Jones, whose thrilling soprano voice 
rises "high, high, high up in the hills." 

There will be an educational talk at Tubman tonight by Margaret Goss. Miss 
Goss will use as her topic, "Why Gentlemen Prefer Blondes." Brunettes — beware, 
take notice and look out! 

As I opened this afternoon's paper I saw startling headlines which informed the 
world that "Mabel Hill is voted New Miss America." In an interview Miss Hill 
said she attributed her success entirely to her long tresses — ^which now almost reach 
lier shoulders! 

Though it may seem rather unusual, Margaret Gilson and Nellie Wilheit have 
gone in for the "silent drama." Their latest vehicle is "Scarlet Socks" — a red-hot 
hit! 

Waurega Jackson and Irene Elliott, despite their usefulness to the business world, 
have been persuaded, matrimonially, that housekeeping is much nicer than book- 
keeping, anyway. 

Did you hear about the near-riot at Junior College? All the boys were rvish- 



55 



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ing around madly, trying to schedule French. Then I discovered the reason. Helen 
Smith and her attractive assistant, Marian Busbia, are teaching the "parlez-vous'-ers." 

There was the cutest company of dancers at Tubman last night ! Although 
their name, "The Naughty Sextette," was slightly shocking — to some — everyone 
"went wild with joy'' at their performance — even Mr. Garrett. \'ou should feel 
highly honored to hear that they were Martha Murphey, Mabel Goodell, Anna 
Kate Weathers, Katie Clark, Alice Griffin and Rachel Bailey, those graceful children 
we used to know at school. 

Lois Levy has realized her life-long ambition to design costumes. At present 
she is planning a charming little hula-hula frock for Sally Stewart, who has been 
residing in Honolulu since her memorable visit there the summer after graduation. 
They say he's very good looking. 

I went to see Tom Mix's latest picture yesterda\ ; and his leading lady was 
Doretta Russell. "Dokey" thrilled the audience with her skillful horsemanship and 
the unique way in which she won Tom, her true love, from the lure of the dangerous 
vamp, Margaret Stokes. 

The Georgia Railroad Bank recently published a list of its bookkeepers and 
stenographers. Five of them are old Tubmanites: Francis Barton, Julia Edwards, 
Clemens McClain, Annie Kate Ward and Lucille McClain! 

Zella Mae Pearson, Alarian Browne and Norma House, noted biologists, have 
written a captivating text-book, entitled, "Why Bug-Doctors Go Crazy." 

There is to be a series of lectures at the Bon-Air V^anderbilt this week by the 
famous chemist, Wyoma Hobbs and her colleague, Georgia Neal, on the "Preparation, 
Properties and L'ses of Kissproof Lipstick. " 

It is reported that Louise Davis, sent to investigate the trouble in Nicaragua, was 
dramatically kidnapped by the dashing General L. Now "the war is over" and they're 
on their honeymoon. 

Have you heard about the rushing business at "Mack's Hot Dog Shoppe?" But 
then, what else could one expect with such charming waitresses as Evelyn McColloch, 
Fanny McNorrill and Leona McKenzie? 

Willie Buck, the musical genius of the year, has organized an orchestra which is 
gaining tremendous popularity. Carolyn Jarrett and Anna Kate Rhodes, well-known 
newspaper reporters, say that ere long Mr. Sousa must relinquish his great reputation 
and sink into hopeless oblivion before his mighty rival. 

Two members of our class have gone in for Grand Opera. Elinor Kitchens and 
Marian Layton are moving great audiences by their marvelous voices, though I don't 
know just where they move them. 

At the Imperial Theatre Monday, Tuesday and Wednesday, Rose Levy and 
Esther Rock are doing a vaudeville act. They say that all during their performance 
the audience is convulsed — with laughter, of course. 

Florence Gilchrist, Ruby Lombard and Martha Dorn, driven by an insatiable 
desire for knowledge, have left for Russia to discover why the natives there have 
steppes instead of elevators. 

Have you noticed how suffering humanity has improved in health since IVIarian 
Harrison, Thelma Chancey and Viola Helmly have become nurses? Of course, they 
really have a great affection for those in pain — and aren't their uniforms attractive? 

Augusta's noted a\iatrix, Mary Spaulding, left Daniel Field yesterday, her goal 
being none other than Paris! She has been commissioned to get an ultra-stylish 



56 



outfit for Margaret Hallman, who in June is going to ... . well, what do people 
usually do in June? 

Did you Tcnow Mary Dye is ranked as one of the greatest e^:plorers of modern 
times? With her delightful modesty Mary declares she owes it "all to Tubman!" 
She says that a great deal of her ability was gained in — or out of — History Class. 

I heard the "Jollity Quartette" over the radio last night and it was just as 
delightful as it sounds. It was composed of Eloise Sanders, Katherine Matheny, 
Cleo Cromer and Norma Thomas. These songbirds sang melodioush', harmoniously 
and erroneously. 

Another of our famous friends is Mary Claire Gardiner, who is rapidly gaining 
fame as Lady Macbeth, in the play by a certain Will Shakespeare. Miss Gardiner's 
favorite part is "Out damned spot!" which she utters in a very realistic manner. 

Mary Anna Harman and Mary Clark are taking orders for their "Nu-Style" 
gym suits which are positively guarantee not to get lost, strayed or stolen. Evelyn 
Brantley demonstrates this marvelous invention with striking grace. 

The Bell Telephone Co. is verj- lucky in having Elise Sanders and Sara Anthony 
in charge of their numerical filing system. This is a positive guarantee against 
"wrong numbers." 

Girzelda Arnette has become very domestic all of a sudden. They say she has 
a most heavenly expression — and a diamond solitaire. 

Have you heard about the wonderful new business college just opened in At- 
lanta? Evelyn Towns and Ruby Steele, the "head men," are forced to hire two 
stalwart policemen to keep back the crowd of applicants. Such is success! 

Speaking of literature — or were we? — Miss Idalene Kimbrell has written a 
"Before and After" testimony for that startling invention of Miss Grace Seals' — 
the pipeless pipe organ. Miss Kimbrell concludes by saying that she never liked 
pipes anyway. Her Ideal smokes El Ropos. 

Augusta's well-known tennis champion. Marguerite Bothwell, is to compete 
next Saturday against Helen Wills for the U. S. Championship. Good Luck, Peggy! 

Don't forget to tune in on station O. U. C. H. next Saturday night. Lees 
Goldberg is going to give an enlightening lecture on "Whv Tea-Hounds Don't 
Bark." 

It is said that Shirley Cobb is having a lovely time in England riding horseback 
with the Prince of Wales. They have many delightful spills together each day. 
Such is life with Royalty. 

Isabelle Ogilvie, inspired by her ardent love for her favorite beverage, has started 
a campaign for "Bigger and Better Chocolate Milks." 

One of the young intellectuals of the city, Miss Katharine Hull, has condescend- 
ingly consented to impart some of her great knowledge by giving private Spanish 
lessons to ambitious bull-fighters. 

Amelia Harley is seeing America first. When last heard from she was having 
a thrilling time in Kalamazoo, Michigan. 

Have you heard about Mildred Holley and Ruth Brisendine's wonderful success 
in Keith's vaudeville? They admit that they owe the success of their tumbling act 
to the daily practice of mental acrobatics they had to undergo in Latin class. 

Anne Wallace has followed the example of Oliver Goldsmith, and is now tour- 
ing Europe on a bicycle. She spends her leisure hours sending picture postal cards 
home. 

Linda Davidson, the literary sensation of the year, is now scouring the Orient for 



57 



1 



JTIA-ID^ MMD A. IVUVlKi: 



material to use in her new- novel, "Why Sheiks Are What They Are." She is ac- 
companied by Miss Harriet Edwards Fiske who is to act as the bait for trapping 
the sheiks. 

Recently I read Helen McXutt's ver\ helpful book on "How I Keep My Sense 
of Humor." It was charmingly illustrated with pictures of Sara Yearly', photo- 
graphed by Carolyn Owens. 

The famous beauty experts, Mildred Pardue and Louise Hardaway, have found 
through their experiences in Chemistry Lab., that by fusing several unknown sub- 
stances they can form an unbalanced equation, one drink of which is guaranteed to 
keep you in fit — or fits! 

Frances Pierce, Neville North and Helen McNutt, on behalf of future Tub- 
manites, left recently for Rome to discover just "How long, pray. Catiline, will you 
abuse our patience?" 

On their way o\er they passed a huge gray battleship. Amid rows of trim 
sailors stood Jean Rogers who was ecstatically enjoying her visit with the Captain's 
wife, Julia Sanders — although that isn't her name now! 

In a talking contest given lately by the Harlem School for Deaf and Dumb, 
Naomi Pomerance easily checked all rivals by her lightning volubility of speech. She 
tells everyone she could never have done it without the wonderful help of her coach, 
Leah Rosenthal. 

Since Miss Wickliife, Tubman's former Gym teacher, has decided that "Jim" 
is much nicer than "gym," she has relinquished her position to Miss Delle Walton 
who has become quite athletic on account of her daily walks to Tubman. 

Betty Jones and Merle Stockton, because of their hard work in helping to compose 
Ye Class Prophecy have become "simply nervous wrecks, my dear" and are planning 
to take a ten years' rest cure on Pike's Peak. 

There is to be a fashion show at White's this week. Dolly Lamback will demon- 
strate "Soil-proof Frocks," designed by the brilliant ^liss ^L^ry ^Lnsur, especially for 
use during hectic exam. days. 

If you feel like "Saying it with flowers," go to Inez Byrd's new florist shop and 
the effect of your "words" will be wonderful! 

Have you read the latest edition of "College Humor?" It has improved tre- 
mendously under its new editor, "Lib" Lockhart, whose wit and humor positively 
defy you to say, "Oh, I've heard that joke before!' 

But even that isn't all — there are some very attractive drawings of Edith Connor, 
by John Held, Jr., who declares that she is the ideal Collegiate type. 

I am very sorr\' to add that Mary Marsh, Audrey White and Mabelle Cartledge, 
after their strenuous efforts on the Annual, have had their brilliant intellects clouded 
and have gone raving distracted. 

Hoping that you are the same, 

SiBVL. 



58 




T. H. S. to A. R. C. 



We Wonder 



How bright is Sarah Bright? 

What will Dot and Frances Pierce? 

If Amalee is really Null and Void. 

Whv is Mozelle Winter instead of Summer? 

Why is Helen Schley? 

Will Elizabeth really Lam-back? 

If some one will catch the Boat-wright away. 

Why is Audrey White and Marion Browne? 

Whom did Annie Page? 

What does Emily Ware? 

Does Katie Mae Doolittle? 

Which Eve belonged to Adam? 

What did Mary Dye? 

Does Margaret Rock-well? 

If Panebaker ever worked for Claussen. 

Whom did Donza Beane ? 

Is Roberta Young ? 

Why Belle is still a Walker with a Ford. 

Why does Mary Balk? 

Whom did Corinne Stone? The same one that Mary Stone-<l. 

If Wickliffe can Ce-more or Ce-leste. 

Why is Neville North instead of South? 

If Lucy Lyeth all the time. 

Is Agnes Gay? 

If Sibyl buys Joy In-grams. 

What Grace Seals. 

If Mabel Hill is near Turpin Hill. 

How to chase Hog Dogs out of the Parks. 

Are Marguerite and Peggy Both-well ? 

If Norma is a sister to Maxwell House. 

If Elizabeth really does Lock-hart-s. 

Nachman is Hamilton. (If you don't see the point, we don't either.) 

— Ida Lee Ballentine, '29. 

— Nellie Wilheit, "28, 



TO CICERO. 

Oration I Section 1 5 

How often while I was a Freshman and Sophomore ; how often truly while I 
was a Junior have you sought to flunk me! How many times have I escaped your 
attacks, written in such a way that they seemed impossible to read ! You do nothing 
to me, and yet you ^o not cease trying to fail me. How often already has the zero 
been wrested from your hand to fall upon the head of some other Junior unluckier 
than I. I do not know on what altar you consecrated and dedicated your orations 
that you think it necessary to plunge them into the brain of a Junior. 

— Catherine Roessler, '29. 



00 



The Evolution of the Bathing Suit 



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We were glancing through some prints from "Godey's Ladies' 
Book" when we were suddenly confronted by a picture of "My 
Lady" of the sedate Eighties, dressed for a plunge in the surf. We 
considered her a courageous and daring soul. Her costume, on 
\ v\l? ' close examination, was built for sinking, not for swimming. She 
wore a large straw hat tied under the chin. Her suit made of 
wool, had long puffed sleeves, and her skirt came well below the 
knees, falling over generous woolen bloomers bagging modestly to 
the ankles. Her shoes were high and laced, and her hands were 
protected from sunburn with gloves. No wonder so few of our 
grandmothers had the fortitude to learn to swim! 

The Godey print inspired us to questions. Our mothers, we 
wtxt told, had gone bathing in knee length dresses, bathing bonnets, silk hosiery and 
beach shoes. Corsets were worn, and false curls tucked inside bathing caps or hats. 
By the time a modest woman could get dressed for the bath, she might discover the 
tide had gone out. 

When a bathing beauty of the Gay Nineties indulged in a very sportive mood, 
she would venture waist deep, clinging to a rope or preferably some strong gentleman's 
hand, giving delicate squeaks as the waves splashed against her. No real lady would 
dive, throwing her heels in the air, and no real lady would stay in the surf long 
enough to sunburn. She couldn't, once her costume was thoroughly wet, or the 
weight of her clothes would have drowned her. 

What would the most daring of the past generation have thought of their 
daughter's swimming channels clad in a coat of grease, or calmly appearing on a 
crowded beach in a one-piece jersey? We are afraid the very suggestion would 
have proved a major calamity edged around with smelling salts! Yet what of it? 
The old stydes actually have their startling effects on us. Last summer at a well 
known beach a number of bathers were surf swimming. It was 
the popular hour, the beach was crowded, the bathers dressed 
according to the lights of 1928. Suddenly a girl tripped down 
the beach, attired in shimmering silk, sheer hosiery, a flowered cap 
and a flattering parasol. She was a throw-back, a sensation, — 
a panic! One small boy, who never before during the five years' 
scope of his life had seen any but jersey bathing suits, shouted 
excitedly to his mother, "Oh, Mama! Look at the lady coming 
in swimming with her dress on!" 

One question holds us. Can the bathing suit of to-day be 
evolutionized further? We wonder — and are breathless. 

— Jane Richardson, '29. 



61 



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Cross Word Puzzle of our Teachers 

VERTICAL 
I. — Long lady with a short name. 
2. — Tubman's favorite candy. 
3. — Rhymes with "dull," but is never so. 
5. — Change the "H" to "B" and the "B" to 
"Z'' in "Hobo." and you have the name 
of her dog. 
7. — What Adam said when Eve gave him the 
apple. (..Apologies for the last two letters.) 
g. — English preposition. 

13. — One of the most irregular verbs in French. 
17. — Neither looks nor acts like her name. 
21. — The "keeper of the B's.'' 

24. — If Miss Woods would us, we could 

make an "A" on our Englisli e.xam. 
27. — It is I, not . 

HORIZONTAL 

I. — First name of four of Tubman's most learned professors. 

(. — Who effected a transformation in Elizabeth? 

6. — .An abbreviation for "The Lad}' and Her Stick." 

8. — What we wish the teachers would have during e.xanis. 
10. — First name of a very classy car. 
II. — Owner of a car that "has the blues." 
12. — .-Xnother Ford, but a Tubman teacher. 
14. — A conjunction in French. 

15. — The hub of the Rotary Wheel as well as that of the Tubman Wheel. 
i6. — E.xclamation ejaculated on stumping your toe. 
18. — To proceed in court (or courting). 
IQ. — A street in .\ugusta that is parallel to Broad. 
20. — A football star on the Georgia team. 
22. — The possessor of curly hair and a Ford Sedan. 

23. — The first half is a vehicle: the second half is a relation: combined, a Tubman teacher. 
25. — A part of the twenty-four-hour day, also a Tubman teacher. 
26. — The "Joy'' of the Commercial Department. 
28. — Tubman's coldest teacher. 
2Q. — Tubman's most fearless teacher who has a positive liking for frogs. 

— Dorothy Joxes, '28. 



What Would Happen— 

If Mrs. Ridgley's Hair didn't come down? 

If Miss Comey lost her energy? 

If Miss Green didn't sav, "Make haste, girls"? 

If Miss Wickliffe didn't smile? 

If Mr. Garrett didn't crack a joke? 

If Mrs. Snow hurried? 

If Mrs. Parks didn't have lunch ready at 12:15? 

If Miss Halbert lost her "stick"? 

If Miss Jones' biscuits were hard? 

If Miss Owens didn't say, "Quiet, girls "? 

If this made the Annual? 

— M. C. Richardson, '29. 



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Miss Norris: "Sarah Bright, what 
is the largest known diamond ?" 

Sarah Bright: "The ace, Miss 
Norris." 

s * » * * 

There are meters iambic, 
There are meters trochaic, 
There are meters in musical tones — 
But the meter 
That's sweeter, 
That's neater, 
Completer, 
Is to meet 'er 
In the moonlight alone. 
***** 

Miss Walker: "What kind of paper 
is used in an air mail letter?" 
Frosh: "Fly paper." 

Sally: "Are you the barber who cut 
my hair the last time?" 

Barber: "No, Fve only been here six 
months." 



Emma Lester (arriving at the Hot 
Dog stand at 12:30): "Gee, I guess 
ril have to call this 'Among my 
ouvemrs. 

Mary Watkins: "Whaddya}'a mean, 
'Among my Souvenirs' ", 

Emma: "There's nothing left for 

me." 

* * * * * 

Miss Comey: "Helen, have you read 
Franklin's autobiography?" 

Helen (awaking from a delightful 
day dream) : "Ought to be what. Miss 
Comey?" 

Miss Comey: "Ought to be paying 
attention." 

Rock-a-bye, Senior, on the tree top. 
As long as you study your grades will 

not drop. 
But if vou stop digging vour standing 

will fall 
And down will come Senior, diploma 

and all. 



6.3 



Ananias 



H 



(His Genealogy From the Beginning to Washington) 
NANIAS was the first man. He lived in a Garden, and had a wife named 
Eve. One day he fell out of an apple tree, killing his brother; then he 
ran auav to the Land of Nod and bin"lt the Tower of Babel. 



One day Samuel Gompers came along and organized the Free Masons, 
and ordered the hands to strike. After that Ananias employed non-union labor and 
built the Ark ; and it rained fire and brimstone forty days and nights, and Sodom and 
Gomorrha were turned into a pillar of salt. 

After many years' wandering in the wilderness, Ananias took his young son, 
Isaac, up into a high mountain and hid him in the bulrushes that grew on the banks 
of the ocean. King Tuts daughter came down to bathe and fished him out. Then 
Ananias was thrown into a pit where he put on a coat of many colors and went 
down into Egypt, and ran for governor on the Republocrat ticket, and was elected 
by a big majority. Then he organized a trust and bought up all the corn in Egypt, 
and there was a famine in the land ; but Ananias and his family lived well. And 
Ananias was cast into a fiery furnace, but angels came and shut the lion's mouths, 
and Ananias came straightway out of the whale's stomach. 

About this time Ananias fell in love with Abraham's daughter, Dorothy Dix, and 
because the old man wouldn't let him hang around there he picked up the house with 
the girl in it and carried them away; then the Philistines tried to steal the girl away, 
and he slew about "steen thousand of them with the jawbone of a mule's papa. 

Ananias's first marriage was such a success that he moved to Utah and joined 
the Mormons and kept marrying until he had three hundred wives. Ananias was 
known as the wisest man in the whole world and he built a great temple; but he 
was terribly afflicted with boils and his wives begged him to curse God and die. 
Instead of doing that, he w ashed his boils in the pool of Siloam and was soon able to 
fiddle while Rome burned, and the Armada was sinking in the English Channel. 

About this time there was a great demand for America to be discovered, so 
Ananias fitted out three small ships and crossed the Delaware on the ice. After cut- 
ting down the cherry tree while his father sawed logs on "Give me liberty or give 
me death" he wrote the Declaration of Independence and the Constitution. Then 
he sank the Battleship Maine on Bunker Hill while the Minute-men chased Brad- 
dock into the Iroquois Country. 

Just now he is the footnote of the Ananias Club and writes speeches for Con- 
gressmen and gentlemen at Washington, Dee See. 

— Margaret Goss. '28. 



64 



HOW I KEEP MV EIGUR1-: 
Hy Am A Lee Null 

Milk I After careful investigation and study I have found that milk 
is the best food to preserve one's youtliful lines. Every woman should 
drink daily at least six quarts of this healthful liquid. It has a tendency 
to give one vigor and energy; it also aids one in liablaring espanol more 
fluently. I find that by drinking one quart immediately upon awakening 
in the morning, followed by one quart for breakfast, eight pints for lunch, 
a half gallon about five o'clock, one quart for supper and a teacupful before 
retiring, I am able to keep myself in perfect health; furthermore, my skin 
has the rosy color so common to babies! 

I have also found that a vigorous afternoon of tennis finished up with 
two dopes, a pound of peanut brittle, four Hershey bars, six pomegranates, 
two peanut butter sandwiches, three Eskimo pies and four chocolate ice- 
cream cones will make one feel as though she had found "The Fountain 
of Youth." 

After drinking thirteen quarts of milk a day for sLx months. I have 
begun to feel like a calf and this is no bull I 



HOW I KEEP MY FIGURE 
By Laura Panebaker 

Swimming is undoubtedly the best way for a woman to retain her figure! 
After going to the Y. \V. C. A, pool twice, I was so pleased witli the 
results this exercise had on my physique, that I decided to go every day, 
and after only three months I accomplished tlie unbelievable feat of swim- 
ming the length of the pool without holding on to the fishing pole! 

When I come out I feel so youthful and childish that I immediately go 
home and play paper-dolls! 

Besides giving one a marvelous figure, swimming may make one famous 
overnight. I am energetically practicing every day and before long I shall 
attempt to swim the Panama Canal! 



^ 



HOW I KEEP MY FIGURE 
By Dorothy Halbert 

For years my doctrine of health was based upon the fable "An apple 
a day keeps the doctor away!'' Now I realize that this is untrue. 

Since giving up that practice I have been on a strict diet of Aunt Fannie's 
vegetable soup. This has a tendency to weaken some persons and cause 
them to reduce from five to ten pounds in a week. I have found it very 
satisfactory for restoring my youthful angles. May I add here that the 
musical possibilities of this soup, as demonstrated by faculty soup-eaters, 
are indeed remarkable ? 

******* 

HOW I KEEP MY FIGURE 

By Celeste Wickliffe 

After being Tubman's leading juvenile for two years it was a great shock 
to find that my vigor was at a low ebb and that my accompaniments were 
becoming less harmonious each day. 

When I had almost despaired of finding the cause for ray decline, Mr. 
Garrett sent me to town in his Ford one day. Tlien it came to me in 
a flash ! What I needed was more exercise — not on the apparatus — not 
basket-ball — not hiking — but in driving a Ford! 

Since that time my acrobatic, terpsichorean, pedagogical, editorial and 
musical activities have increased and I have been asked by the Hollywood 
Picture Corporation to double for Clara Bow. 

Any objection which Miss Boatwright may raise to this method which 
I endorse may be attributed to the fact that she drives an open car! 
******* 

HOW I KEEP MY FIGURE 

By Williamette Green 

I believe that a woman should be well informed about angles and curves 
in order to keep fit and have a Garboish figure. 

After witnessing Ziegfeld Follies, I acquired the idea of dancing! I 
purchased a white bathing suit and every day after trying to teach curves 
and angles to the girls of T. H. S. I go home, put on my bath dress, 
turn on the victrola and begin. After many Iiours of infinite fun. whirling, 
twirling, twisting, arabesquing, splitting, back bending and handspringing, 
I feel like a million dollars. In this way I not only keep fit. but my figure 
vould doubtless show up quite well against any of Mr. Ziegfeld's most 
noted beauties! 

— ■ Teety Garrett, '28. 



65 



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created by Virgil \^ ©vh 

Hollingsiuorth 



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The South's Contribution 
to the world's fine things 

Sold m America's finer drug stores 
VIRGIL HOLLINGSWORTH. AUGUSTA, GA. 



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CONGRATULATING THE GRADUATING CLASS 
OF 1928! 

Tubman graduates, ive congratulate you. J. B. W kite & Co. 
take interest in you and in your achievements, and we 
trust that this ivill be in very truth, a "commence- 
ment" only of the great things to come in the 
lives of each one of you. 

J. B. WHITE & COMPANY 



AUGUSTA, 



GEORGIA 



Doctor (examining life insurance prospect) — Do you ever talk in your 
sleep? 

Prospect — No, but I often talk in other people's sleep. 
Doctor — But how can that be? 
Prospect — I'm a high school teacher. 



COMPLIMENTS 
OF— 



FORTSON & LAW 

GENERAL INSURANCE 

REAL ESTATE 

LOANS 



104 Herald Bids 



Phone 284 



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COMPLIMENTS 
OF— 



AUGUSTA DRUG 
COMPANY 



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T. S. CLAEK 



CLARK 

REAL ESTATE 
COMPANY 



PHONE 3868 



307 S. F. C. BLDG. 



AUGUSTA SPORTING 
GOODS CO. 

Distributors 

A. G. Spalding & Bros, and 

P. Goldsmith Sons Co. 

Athletic Equipment 

Golf and Tennis Supplies 

Rackets Restrung 

212 Eighth Street 

Augusta, : Georgia 



Mother — Now, Dorothy, suppose you were to hand Frances a plate with a 
large and small piece of cake on it. wouldn't you tell her to take the larger 
piece? 

Dot— No. 

Mother — Why not? 

Dot — Because it wouldn't be necessary! 



MAXWELL BROTHERS 



FURNITURE 



933-935 Broad Street 



PHONE 4000 



Augusta, 



Georgia 



4^r 



COMPLIMENTS 
OF— 

MERRY BROTHERS 

Manufacturers 

BUILDING BRICK 

FACE BRICK 

HOLLOW BUILDING TILE 

403 Marion Building 



Augusta, 



Georgia 



Thirty Years of Courtesy, 

Capacity, Service 






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COMPLIMENTS OF 



GEORGIA RAILROAD BANK 



AUGUSTA, GEORGIA 



Teacher — I have went. That's wrong, isn't it? 

Maggie — Yes, ma'am. 

Teacher — Why is it wrong? 

Maggie — Because you ain't went yet. 



COMPLIMENTS 
OF— 

AUGUSTA-AIKEN 

RAILWAY & ELEaRIC 

CORPORATION 



LAND DRUG COMPANY 



Augusta, 



Georgia 



COMPLIMENTS 
OF— 



THE L F. M. STORE 



Pay Cash 



830 Broad St. 



Pay Less 



Phone 289 



HUTT'S GARDEN HOSE 

The Henry Hutt Company 

Plumbing and Heating Supplies 

Showrooms: 611 Broad St., Augusta, Ga. 

It pays to deal with a 
reliable firm. 



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10 BE LOVELY— 

use the preparations of 
Elizabeth Arden 

ELIZABETH ARDEN S 

VENETIAN TOILET 

PREPARATIONS 

ore on sale at 

GARDELLE'S 

BKOAD AT THE MONUMENT 



BOWEN BROS. 
HARDWARE CO. 

HARDWARE AND 

SPORTING GOODS 

Since 1849 
90.5 Broad Street 



AUGUSTA. 



GEORGIA 



Miss Dudley — ^ ho were the Knights of the Garter? 

Mabel Hill — They were the king's supporters, weren't they? 

Linda — Too bad Shakespeare wasn't born in London. 

Jean — ^ hy so? 

Linda — I said he was. on that exam. 



Permanent W aving 

Expert Hair W aving 

Marceling 
Finger W aving 

Shampooing 

Manicures 

HARWORTH'S 
BEAUTY PARLOR 

219 Leonard Building 
PHONE 562 



STELLING 
SHOE 
COMPANY 

810 BROAD STREET 

Retailers of 
FASHIONABLE FOOTWEAR 

YOUR INSPECTION INVITED 



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EVERY DOLLAR SPENT AT 



Red Arrow Filling Stations 



IS RE-INVESTED IN AUGUSTA 



Keep Your Dollars at Home and Watch Our City Grow 



PEOPLES OIL COMPANY 



H. C. BOARDMAN'S SONS, Proprietors 



"Allow- me to present my wife to you." 
"Many thanks, but I have one." 



* *^ * * 



Teacher — What steps would you take if you saw a dangerous lion on the 
campus? 

Harriet — Lons ones! 



School Memory Books 

Fine Stationerv 

Engravi.vg 

FouxTAix Pens 

We Engrave Name on fountain Pens 
and pencils bought here. 

Murphy Stationery Co. 

756 BROAD STREET 



CULPEPPER BROS. 

ASSISTANT 

HOME 

BUILDERS 

1019 Broad Street 
AUGUSTA. GEORGIA 



BOWEN AND HULBERT CO. 

829 Broad Street 
Phone 3148 

UP-TO-DATE and COMPLETE 
LINE OF SPORTING GOODS 



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RUBEN'S 

The Store of Real Values 

NEWEST IN READY-TO-WEAR 
MILLINERY 

864 Broad Street 
AUGUSTA, GEORGIA 



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71 



HERFF-JONES COMPANY 

OFFICIAL JEWELER 

— For — 

TUBMAN HIGH STANDARD 

CLASS RINGS AND PINS 

{Secure them for any graduating year through officers 
of Senior or Junior Classes) 

H. S. CANFIELD, Georgia Representative 
Ansley Hotel Bldg., : Atlanta, Georgia 

A College Tragedy in Four Acts — 
Act I — Cram 
Act II — Exam 
Act III— Flunk 
Act IV— Trunk 

THE PERKINS MANUFACTURING COMPANY 

YELLOW PINE LUMBER, 

MILL WORK, DOORS, SASH AND BLINDS 

AUGUSTA, GEORGIA 

620 Thirteenth Street PHONE 711 

HANSBERGER'S PHARMACY 

DRUGS, TOILET ARTICLES AND CANDY 

( 2667 
934 BROAD STREET Phones gees 

J , __^ ^1 



72 



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Phones 2600-2601 



GENERAL TIRE & 
SUPPLY CO. 

Goodyear Tires 

Broad at 12th Street 



AUGUSTA, 



GEORGIA 



¥ 



THE 



Citizens & Southern 
Bank 



SOLICITS YOUR BUSINESS 

Interest Paid on Savings Quarterly. 

Start Life Right by Opening a Savings 

Acconnt 

Total Assets Over 
$70,000,000.00 

A^o Account Too Large 

— None Too Small 



Acts as Executors, Guardians, 
Trustees 



Teacher in study — "Can't you find something to do?" 

Lillie — "Gee whiz! Am I expected to do the work and find it too?" 

^ ^ * * * 

Little George, the garage mascot, was visiting his aunt. He found the cat in 
a sunny window purring cheerfully. "Oh, Auntie, come quick," said little 
George, "the cat has gone to sleep and left his engine running." 



ANDREWS BROTHERS 
COMPANY 

Ladies' Wearing Apparel 

Dry Goods : Furniture : Rugs 

Victrolas 

870 Broad Street 
AUGUSTA, GEORGIA 



Lockhart, McAuIiffe & Co. 

INCORPORATED 

Real Estate 
Fire Insurance 

So7 BROAD ST., AUGUSTA, GA. 



COMPLIMENTS OF 



Imperial, Modjeska and 
Rialto Theatres 



COMPLIMENTS 

OF 

AUGUSTA 
HERALD 






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SAXON-CULLUM 
SHOE COMPANY 



922 BROAD STREET 



Always Busy 



PHONE 978 



"Robert," said the teacher, to drive home the lesson, which was on charity 
and kindness, "if I saw a man beating a donkey and stopped him from doing 
so, what virtue would I be showing?" 

"Brotherly love," said Bobby promptly. 



Alex. G. Edelblut Furniture 
Company 

"The Store of Quality and Originality" 

Modern Furniture : Reproductions 

Antiques : Talirics : Rugs 
Imported Brassware 

319-321 Eighth (Jackson Street) 



BAILIE FURNITURE CO. 

Furniture : Wallpaper : Rugs 

Window Shades and Awnings 

Picture Framing a Specialty 

712 Broad St. Phone 1632 



FOR FRAMING DIPLOMAS 

Photographs and All Work 
of Art 

—CALL AT— 

Harper Bros. Art Store 



426 8th Street 



Phone 730 



L. J. SCHAUL & COMPANY 



GOLDSMITHS : SILVERSMITHS 
JEWELERS 



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74 



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■ SUCCESS TO THE 
TUBMAN GIRLS 

LEAGUE, DUVALL & 
POWELL 

REALTORS 

— and — 

GENERAL INSURANCE 

Herald Building 



,^ 



TOMMINS 



^ 



PHOTOGRAPHER 



^ 



852 Broad 



Phone 2314 



Husband — They say the prettiest women marry the biggest dumb-bells. 
Wife — You flatterer! 

Sambo — I want a rassa. 

Clerk— Safety? 

Sambo — No, sah; I wants it fo' social purposes. 



BRICK FOR YOUR HOME 

Nothing will give you the satisfaction that a BRICK HOME will. 
It makes the difference between a "HOME" and a "HOUSE." 



Cool in Summer 
Low Insurance Rates 



Warm in Winter 
Minimum Depreciation 



High Resale Value 



We have many kinds of high grade face bricks as well as common 
brick and hollow tile. Bring your building problems to us. 

GEORGIA-CAROLINA BRICK COMPANY 



AUGUSTA, 



GEORGIA 






75 



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Georgia-Carolina 

Dairy Products 

Company 



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SANJINS' 



CREAM 



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"A PERFECT FOOD" 



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SOUTHERN 



REAL ESTATE 
LOANS 
INSURANCE 

AUTOMOBILE FINANCING 

Southern Finance Building 



if 



INSIST ON 



CLAUSSEN'S 



BREAD 



CAKES 



Since 1841 — Favorites 



Big Joe — When I was a little boy vour age, I didn t tell lies. 
Little Joe — How old were you when jou started, pop? 

Newly rich being (very intellectual) — Professor, tell me: Is Bach still 
composing? 

Professor (quietly) — No, Madam, he is decomposing. 



COOPER 
HARDWARE 
COMPANY 

Wholesale and Retail 

SPORTING GOODS 
AND 
HARDWARE 

877 Broad Street 
AUGUSTA, GEORGIA 






COMPLIMENTS 
OF— 



DAVID T. BUSSEY 



I 

Chevrolet Dealer 



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SCROGGS & EWING 



ARCHITECTS 



SOU. FINANCE BLDG. 



AUGUSTA, GEORGIA 



Dorothy Jones — Doesn t studying hurt your eves? 
Margaret Gilson — How do I know? 

Edmunda — Did you hear about the wreck on the streetcar? 

Ardene — Why no. 

Edmunda — \^'ell. a man had his eve on a seat and a ladv sat on it. 



REALTY SAVINGS & 
TRUST COMPANY 



J. Lee Etheredge . 
J Frank Carswell 
A. B. Von Kamp . 
Le Rov AV. Lveth . 



Pre.sident 
Vice-Pres. 
Vice-Pre.s. 
Sec.-Treas. 



51-% Paid on Time Certificates 
5% Paid on Savings 

827 BROAD STREET 






SPRING 1928 



WOMEN'S 
READY-TO-WEAR 



QUALITY 



SCHNEIDER'S 



AUGUSTA, 



GEORGIA 



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GAS 

THE IDEAL FUEL! 

THE GAS LIGHT CO. 

OF AUGUSTA 






THE NATIONAL 
EXCHANGE BANK 

Augustas Only National Bank 

A National Bank 

— with — 

A Savings Department 

in which 

every Tubman girl is cordially in- 
vited to liave a savings account. 

Start While Young 

Member Federal Reserve System 



WM. SCHWEIGERT 



846 Broad Street 
AUGUSTA, GA. 



Phone 359 



UNUSUAL GIFTS 



Millinery for 

DISCRIMINATING 
BUYERS 



E. C. BALK & CO. 

918 Broad Street 






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Dependable ;_; Economical 
Convenient 




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„ FLOUR 



CLARK MILLING CO. 



AN AUGUSTA PRODUCT OF SUPERIOR C^ALITY 



For Sale by Lending Grocers 




Dr. Henry J. Godin 

OPTOMETRIST 

STCillT Sl'KCIALlST 



Offices: 956-956 Vj Broad St. Phone 1478 



Dealers in Peace of Mind 

THAT'S WHAT GOOD 
INSURASCE MEX ARE 

Lorick & Vaiden Agency 

LIFE INSURANCE 

Second l-'loor — Soutliern Finance Building: 

AUGUSTA. GEORGIA 



SC OTT NIX ON 



INSURANCE. REAL ESTATE 

104 Masonic BIdg.. AUGUSTA 






lAiken 
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AUGUSTA, GA. 



D 



Tears a School Teacher 



For 



The ideal of service has uever been morf nobly exemplified than by Jennie Lynch, 
a fuU half century, she taught in one school in New York City. 

To her perseverance, patience, kindliness and honor, and to her keen sense of duty, 
thousands of her pupils who have grown into matured life,, owe to her a debt of gratitude 
which they will never be able to pay. 

Sen'ing others, whether it may be in the school room, in the great professions or behind 
the store counter, and doing it .lust a little better day by day, is always worthy the best 
that is in us. 

Service is one of life's loftiest aims. 



QC^^^^^ 



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That girl is so dumb that she thinks 
that "Stop, Look and Listen" are the 
"Three Musketeers." 






T^hoenix Oil 
Company 



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Production 

of your 
Annual 
Gom bines 

the 
Snsbiration 

/of 
Ancient 
Artisans 
and the skill 
of Modern 
Graftsmen 




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